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Denuvo - In The News

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XenocodeRCE

That dates you for sure

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Apuromafo

other new:
https://layer13.net/rls?id=7905532
 

RELEASE NAME ───────■   Constructor-CPY                                 
        RELEASE DATE ───────■   14/06/2017                                      
        SHOP RELEASE DATE ──■   26/05/2017                                      
        RELEASE TYPE ───────■   GAME                                            
        KIND ───────────────■   Simulator                                       
        FORMAT ─────────────■   ISO                                             
        PROTECTION ─────────■   Steam + Denuvo v4 x86                           
        FILES N ────────────■   41x100   

 

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Blah
https://torrentfreak.com/the-evil-within-2-used-denuvo-then-dumped-it-before-launch-171013/

 

https://torrentfreak.com/deep-down-games-pirates-love-enemies-like-denuvo-171022/

 

Edited by Blah (see edit history)
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Blah
https://torrentfreak.com/the-evil-within-2-used-denuvo-then-dumped-it-before-launch-171013/

https://torrentfreak.com/assassins-creed-origin-drm-hammers-gamers-cpus-171030/

Assassins Creed Origin DRM Hammers Gamers’ CPUs

Assassin's Creed Origins gamers are reporting massive CPU utilization. While the game is said to be quite resource-hungry already, game cracker Voksi informs TorrentFreak that anti-piracy efforts are to blame. With Denuvo in trouble, Ubisoft has called in reinforcements which are reportedly dragging down all but the most powerful machines. "It's anti-consumer and a disgusting move," he says.

denuvo.jpgThere’s a war taking place on the Internet. On one side: gaming companies, publishers, and anti-piracy outfits. On the other: people who varying reasons want to play and/or test games for free.

While these groups are free to battle it out in a manner of their choosing, innocent victims are getting caught up in the crossfire. People who pay for their games without question should be considered part of the solution, not the problem, but whether they like it or not, they’re becoming collateral damage in an increasingly desperate conflict.

For the past several days, some players of the recently-released Assassin’s Creed Origins have emerged as what appear to be examples of this phenomenon.

“What is the normal CPU usage for this game?” a user asked on Steam forums. “I randomly get between 60% to 90% and I’m wondering if this is too high or not.”

The individual reported running an i7 processor, which is no slouch. However, for those running a CPU with less oomph, matters are even worse. Another gamer, running an i5, reported a 100% load on all four cores of his processor, even when lower graphics settings were selected in an effort to free up resources.

“It really doesn’t seem to matter what kind of GPU you are using,” another complained. “The performance issues most people here are complaining about are tied to CPU getting maxed out 100 percent at all times. This results in FPS [frames per second] drops and stutter. As far as I know there is no workaround.”

So what could be causing these problems? Badly configured machines? Terrible coding on the part of the game maker?

According to Voksi, whose ‘Revolt’ team cracked Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus before its commercial release last week, it’s none of these. The entire problem is directly connected to desperate anti-piracy measures.

As widely reported (1,2), the infamous Denuvo anti-piracy technology has been taking a beating lately. Cracking groups are dismantling it in a matter of days, sometimes just hours, making the protection almost pointless. For Assassin’s Creed Origins, however, Ubisoft decided to double up, Voksi says.

“Basically, Ubisoft have implemented VMProtect on top of Denuvo, tanking the game’s performance by 30-40%, demanding that people have a more expensive CPU to play the game properly, only because of the DRM. It’s anti-consumer and a disgusting move,” he told TorrentFreak.

Voksi says he knows all of this because he got an opportunity to review the code after obtaining the binaries for the game. Here’s how it works.

While Denuvo sits underneath doing its thing, it’s clearly vulnerable to piracy, given recent advances in anti-anti-piracy technology. So, in a belt-and-braces approach, Ubisoft opted to deploy another technology – VMProtect – on top.

VMProtect is software that protects other software against reverse engineering and cracking. Although the technicalities are different, its aims appear to be somewhat similar to Denuvo, in that both seek to protect underlying systems from being subverted.

“VMProtect protects code by executing it on a virtual machine with non-standard architecture that makes it extremely difficult to analyze and crack the software. Besides that, VMProtect generates and verifies serial numbers, limits free upgrades and much more,” the company’s marketing reads.

VMProtect and Denuvo didn’t appear to be getting on all that well earlier this year but they later settled their differences. Now their systems are working together, to try and solve the anti-piracy puzzle.

“It seems that Ubisoft decided that Denuvo is not enough to stop pirates in the crucial first days [after release] anymore, so they have implemented an iteration of VMProtect over it,” Voksi explains.

“This is great if you are looking to save your game from those pirates, because this layer of VMProtect will make Denuvo a lot more harder to trace and keygen than without it. But if you are a legit customer, well, it’s not that great for you since this combo could tank your performance by a lot, especially if you are using a low-mid range CPU. That’s why we are seeing 100% CPU usage on 4 core CPUs right now for example.”

The situation is reportedly so bad that some users are getting the dreaded BSOD (blue screen of death) due to their machines overheating after just an hour or two’s play. It remains unclear whether these crashes are indeed due to the VMProtect/Denuvo combination but the perception is that these anti-piracy measures are at the root of users’ CPU utilization problems.

While gaming companies can’t be blamed for wanting to protect their products, there’s no sense in punishing legitimate consumers with an inferior experience. The great irony, of course, is that when Assassin’s Creed gets cracked (if that indeed happens anytime soon), pirates will be the only ones playing it without the hindrance of two lots of anti-piracy tech battling over resources.

The big question now, however, is whether the anti-piracy wall will stand firm. If it does, it raises the bizarre proposition that future gamers might need to buy better hardware in order to accommodate anti-piracy technology.

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evlncrn8

yeh i think denuvo's claims that they dont impact performance have now been proven to be bullshit... though ubi did go a wee bit over the top 

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Blah
Quote

https://torrentfreak.com/denuvo-has-been-sold-to-global-anti-piracy-outfit-irdeto-180123/

Denuvo, the company behind the world's most famous video game anti-piracy system, has been sold. The buyer is global anti-piracy outfit Irdeto, which specializes in protecting all kinds of content, with an emphasis on the audio-visual sector. The news comes a day after Denuvo's latest protection was defeated by pirates after a couple of months in the wild

 

etc etc

 

 

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JohnWho

Did Denuvo directly work with the VMProtect crew on implementing the dual protection or did Ubisoft themself apply the VMProtect layer ontop of the Denuvo protected game?

On a side note, game devs should have a "software protection" specialist on the team and implement anti hack/crack/piracy features directly into the game core.

Edited by JohnWho (see edit history)
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atom0s

A while back Denuvo was being accused of stealing / using VMProtect's stuff without permission but it was debunked by VMProtect themselves stating that Denuvo had a valid license to use it and such. So it's probably part of Denuvo itself and not something done by Ubi. 

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Extreme Coders

 

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joker33337
On 2/7/2018 at 7:48 PM, Extreme Coders said:

 

Just so people know - a dump made this way will contain license information possibly tied to your PC and Steam account

By the way, attaching system .dll headers to your dump and manually patching CPUID without a good way to determine if they're actual instructions instead of data feels really wrong to me :unsure: never mind you can miss some if they are encrypted and only decrypted in place at runtime

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deepzero

Yeah that seems like a mediocre crack, easily fooled by a few randomly triggered checks, he also leads on he cant devirtualize it properly... Anyways props for him for makeing this public, more than most others did so far...

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Blah

heres the story as of now

 

https://torrentfreak.com/voksi-releases-detailed-denuvo-cracking-video-tutorial-180210/

 

Quote

Voksi Releases Detailed Denuvo-Cracking Video Tutorial

  • on February 10, 2018
 

Over the past few years, the name Voksi has become synonymous with game cracking, in particular when it comes to anti-Denuvo activities. This week the talented Bulgarian released a 90-minute video in which he reveals how he cracked V4 of the infamous anti-tamper technology. TorrentFreak caught up with him for the lowdown.

etc etc etc

Quote

 

 

 

 

Edited by Blah (see edit history)
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JustAGuy
Posted (edited)
On 09/02/2018 at 10:00 AM, joker33337 said:

Just so people know - a dump made this way will contain license information possibly tied to your PC and Steam account
 

 

I remember scene groups (PROPHET one of them)  embedding unique licence file into a main game executable , seems nobody bothers about  being identified....it was other known commercial game protection system .....not denuvo

Edited by JustAGuy (see edit history)
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Blah

Latest Denuvo Anti-Piracy Protection Falls, Cracker ‘Voksi’ On Fire

July 6, 2018

 

https://torrentfreak.com/latest-denuvo-anti-piracy-protection-falls-cracker-voksi-on-fire-180706/

 

 

heres the story as of now

 

https://torrentfreak.com/voksi-releases-detailed-denuvo-cracking-video-tutorial-180210/

 

Quote

Voksi Releases Detailed Denuvo-Cracking Video Tutorial

  • on February 10, 2018
 

Over the past few years, the name Voksi has become synonymous with game cracking, in particular when it comes to anti-Denuvo activities. This week the talented Bulgarian released a 90-minute video in which he reveals how he cracked V4 of the infamous anti-tamper technology. TorrentFreak caught up with him for the lowdown.

etc etc etc

Quote

https://torrentfreak.com/denuvo-has-been-sold-to-global-anti-piracy-outfit-irdeto-180123/

Denuvo, the company behind the world's most famous video game anti-piracy system, has been sold. The buyer is global anti-piracy outfit Irdeto, which specializes in protecting all kinds of content, with an emphasis on the audio-visual sector. The news comes a day after Denuvo's latest protection was defeated by pirates after a couple of months in the wild

 

etc etc

 

 

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JohnWho
Quote

Denuvo's latest protection was defeated by pirates after a couple of months in the wild

 

Sounds like it did it's job

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